Conventions in a Time of COVID

Just popping in here briefly to inform everyone of another postponement.  Soonercon, originally scheduled for June, is now postponing to June 25-27, 2021.  As I’ve been doing to help ease the pain for most conventions, I’ve merely asked to have my vendor space passed forward to 2021.  I figure it’s the least I can do.  At the moment, this makes my next event to be Libertycon where I’ll be going as a professional and a couple of small engagements in St. Louis, MO and Lawrence, KS in the summer. Given how things are going, I’ll put those dates out once they’re reconfirmed.

Against the backdrop of a pandemic, this is not a back breaker for me.  I still have the day gig and *knocks on wood* haven’t had a brush with the virus yet.  Others are not so lucky.  A lot of artists, authors, and other entertainers I know are hurting horribly from the ripple effects of this pandemic, and it’s going to take awhile for the “Con Familia” to recover.  So I implore you, if  you know someone whose primary business is being a vendor at a convention or artist, please “toss a coin to your painter / writer, etc.”  If you’re not able to see them in person this year, I encourage you to go to their internet, Etsy, etc. and buy something.

Don’t want to risk dealing with germs possibly being carried on packages?  Well, if you have the change to spare, become a Patreon for a little bit at their lowest level of contribution.  Yes, it’s probably only a buck…but if 400 friends each donate a buck, that’s a car payment, groceries, utility bill, etc..  “1000 people, sufficiently motivated, can kill a hostile lion armed only with ice picks”-definitely applies in these times of economic stress.  To be clear–by no means should you put yourself at economic risk (unlike the hunters in the analogy), but every little bit would help artists who may literally be worrying about keeping the lights on.

(For those who like Anita C. Young’s art, her Patreon is here.  I mean, I’m pretty sure I’d go to the proverbial “Special Hell” if I didn’t promote my favorite artist and booth babe.  In that same vein, if you like fantasy art, I also recommend my regular con neighbor and  DnD player, Chelsea Mann.)

Failing direct economic action, promote your favorite authors / artists on social media.  Quarantine is a great time to dive into a new book series or recommend something for a group read along.  Or if you’re so inclined, buy a book to donate to your local nursing home, cancer ward, or assisted living library.  With a lot of the restrictions in place, the inhabitants of those facilities are not getting to see visitors.  You can both help an author and put a smile on people’s face.

Things are bad, but I’m convinced that we will all collectively make it through this.  Yes, it is grim when multiple friends are not able to hold funerals, weddings, or graduations due to this. I don’t even think we’re into the worst of it yet.  But at heart I’m an optimist, and so far Humanity has managed to pull through all sorts of calamity to get to this point.  Hug your loved ones close and check up on friends who may have been suffering from mental illness previously.  Try to get outside as the restrictions of your area permits.  Take this time to reconnect with someone you might have lost touch with.  I’m looking forward to seeing all of you later this year when all this is behind us, and hopefully with more books than you saw me with last time.

Warship Wednesday–Territories and Mission

If you ever wonder just how crazy things got with the end of the Washington Naval Treaty, look no further than the Alaska-class large cruisers.  Unlike the poster (and it’s a lovely series), I’ve never been of the school of thought that the Alaska-class were considered to be battlecruisers.  First, generally the Navy tended to be pretty clear about their designations during the design process in the 1930s-1940s.  This was due to Congress having a nasty habit of shifting around funds.  Second, the Alaska vessels were NEVER intended to get anywhere near a battleline or, for that matter, really stand in a line of battle.  Finally, there’s that problem with the underwater protection.  While not strictly true, in general the pre-World War II USN believed capital ships needed to reinforced against torpedoes and mines, whereas cruisers were more of a “Meh, sucks to be that crew, but we had to figure out something to keep it within treaty limitations.”

In any case, it would be interesting to see what would have happened had these vessels have ended up in a surface fight.  Thankfully the constraints of construction prevented it from happening in time for the Solomon Islands campaign.  That would have been very, very bad, given the Alaskas were not known for their nimbleness and presented a rather large target.  I can see First Guadalcanal being even bloodier with Alaska present, as there would have been probably a few minutes of her punching the crap out of Hiei or Kirishima followed shortly by “I’ve never seen a vessel take so many Long Lances in my life.”

All this means is that the Alaska-class really serve as a cautionary tale regarding hysteria, intelligence, and mission.  They were far from bad ships.  However, they really represent resources that could have been better spent elsewhere.  Unfortunately, the lag between design, resource allocation, and construction meant they developed an inertia of their own.

On the alternate history front, expect to see the Alaska and Guam make an appearance in both the Usurper’s War-series as well as another project.  😀

The Cosmic Chuckling Continues

So the original version of this event was announcing my location and attendance at Planet Comic Con 2020, 20-22 March at Bartle Hall in Kansas City.  As usual, I was going to be in attendance with Anita C. Young with her artwork and books.

Well, as you can see if you go to the Planet Comic Con website link above, the Con has been postponed (full statement here).

 

KCPCC 2020 Location

Alas, right now the dates they’re talking about for the postponement take place in September 2020.  Given that I have a couple commitments in that month already (see Cincy Comic Con), this means I’m going to take the option to have my tables this year rolled over to 2021.

This is going to be a crazy time due to the Covid-19 virus.  I hope everyone stays safe and healthy and look forward to seeing you guys on the Con circuit when (and I do think it will be when) this pandemic is past us.

You can order Anita’s new magnets at our Etsy store.

Warship Wednesday: Fun With Turrets

Thanks to the U.S.S. Iowa for filming this interior of the 16-inch turrets.  In the case of the Iowa and many other late war ships, each gun could elevate and fire independently.  Bonus:  Here is a World War II-era training video.

As an author, as I watched this I realized just how many things could get knocked out by a partial penetration of the armor.  Bombs hitting near the turret would probably cut power cables, shells could jam the turret ring, etc., etc.

I also noted the redundancy in plotting and fire control, something which was not always prevalent in early war / World War I modernized ships.  Although switching positions is going to lead to a degradation of capability, at least redundancy gives the vessel a chance to keep swinging rather than becoming a mission kill.